list windows updates from command line


As any Windows user knows, keeping your operating system up to date is crucial to maintaining the health and security of your computer. Microsoft releases new updates for Windows on a regular basis, and it’s important to install them as soon as possible. In the past, installing Windows updates was a bit of a hassle. You had to go to the Control Panel, check for updates, and then install them one by one. Fortunately, Microsoft has made it much easier to manage updates in recent versions of Windows. One of the easiest ways to install updates is from the command line. In this blog post, we’re going to show you how to list, check, and install Windows updates from the command line. We’ll also share some tips and tricks for using the command line to manage updates more effectively.(Image Suggestion: A computer monitor displaying a status bar with the current Windows update level and a prompt to check for updates.)

Listing Windows Updates from the Command Line

Windows updates are a necessary part of keeping your computer running smoothly. However, some people may find it easier to manage their windows updates from the command line. This article will explain how to do this, and what benefits you can expect.

First, you need to know what information you need in order to list windows updates from the command line. You will need the following:

– The name of the operating system (for example, Windows 8)

– The version number of the operating system (for example, 16299.17000)

– The build number of the operating system (for example, 17134)

– The date/time stamp of the update (for example, 10/1/2017 200 PM)

Once you have this information, you can use the following command to list all available updates for that particular version of Windows: wuauclt. For instance, if I wanted to list all available updates for Windows 8.1 64-bit edition with build 17134 on October 1st 2017 at 2pm EST, I would issue the following command: wuauclt /detectnow /reportall. Which would return something like this:

UpdateId ProductName Branch Version Build Status Date Posted

———- ——— ——- —— —- ——————

4018352 WSUS Offline Current 16299.17000 17134 10/01/2017 0200 PM

5018440 KB4019216 W32Time Updater Not applicable 16299.17000 17134 10/01/2017 0200 PM

5998456 KB4019224 x64cpu Updater Not applicable 16299.17000 17134 10/01/2017 0200 PM

6018592 Security Update for Internet Explorer Flash Player for 32-bit Systems (KB4019264) Not applicable 11 999999910 10/10/2017 0430 AM

6018592 Security Update for Internet Explorer Flash Player for 32-bit Systems (KB4019264) Not applicable 11 999999910 10/10/2017 0430 AM

Now that we know what we’re looking for, we can start listing updates by issuing the following commands one at a time:

wuauclt /displayupdate /updatenow 4018352

wuauclt /displayupdate /updatenow 5018440

wuauclt /displayupdate /updatenow 5998456

wuauclt /displayupdate /updatenow 6018592

Once update 4018352 has been downloaded and installed, our output should look something like this:

UpdateId ProductName Branch Version Build Status Date Posted

———- ——— ——- —— —- ——————

4018352 WSUS Offline Current 16299.17000 17134 10/01//2017 12PM

5018440 KB4019216 W32Time Updater Not applicable 16299.17000 17134 10/01//2017 12PM

5998456 KB4019224 x64cpu Updater Not applicable 16299.17000 17134 10/01//2017 12PM

6018592 Security Update for Internet Explorer Flash Player for 32-bit Systems (KB4019264) Not applicable 11 999999910 0950AM

6018592 Security Update for Internet Explorer Flash Player for 32-bit Systems (KB4019264) Not applicable 11 999999910 0950AM

once update 6018440 has been downloaded and installed, our output should look something like this:

UpdateId ProductName Branch Version Build Status Date Posted

———- ——— ——- —— —- ——————

6018440 KB4019216 W32Time Updater Successfully completed

Checking for Windows Updates from the Command Line

Windows updates are an important part of keeping your computer safe and healthy. However, sometimes you may find it more convenient to check for updates from the command line. This guide will show you how to do this.

There are a variety of options available when checking for updates from the command line. For example, you can use the “wuauclt” tool to check for available updates, or you can use the “wusa” tool to install updates. Additionally, you can use the “cmd” tool to run specific commands that are related to Windows Updates.

Finally, this guide provides instructions on how to install updates from the command line. This is an important step if you want to ensure that your computer is always up-to-date with security patches and other improvements.

There are a variety of different ways to check for updates from the command line. For example, you can use the “wuauclt” tool to check for available updates. This tool is located in the “Windows Update” folder on your computer. You can also use the “wusa” tool to install updates. This tool is located in the “Windows Sources” folder on your computer. Finally, you can use the “cmd” tool to run specific commands that are related to Windows Updates.

To check for available updates, type wuauclt at the prompt and press Enter. This will open the “Windows Update” window. From here, you can click on the “Available Updates” link under the heading “View Available Updates.” This will display a list of all available updates that are currently compatible with your version of Windows. If there are any new or updated updates available, they will be displayed in this list. You can then select one or more of these updates and click on the “Install” button next to it to install them onto your computer.

To install an update using the wusa tool, type wusa at the prompt and press Enter. This will open a window similar to that shown in Figure 1 below. In this window, you need to provide some information such as your product name (for instance, Microsoft Windows 10), edition (for instance, Professional), and version number (for instance, 1709). After providing this information, you will need to choose which files from Microsoft’s update repository should be downloaded and installed onto your computer (see Figure 2 below). Clicking on Next will take you through further steps such as selecting whether you want prompts during installation or not (see Figure 3 below), setting up an automatic restart policy after installation is complete (see Figure 4 below), and choosing where on your hard drive you want Windows Update installed (/Common Files/Microsoft Update/ for Installed Updates). After finishing these steps, clicking on Finish will download and install all of the selected files onto your computer.

Viewing Windows Update History from the Command Line

Windows Update history can be useful for understanding what updates have been installed on a system, and also which updates were attempted but failed. The Windows Updatehistory command can be used to list all updates from the Command Line, including both installed and non-installed updates. This can be helpful in troubleshooting issues with updates or in tracking down which specific update caused an issue. Additionally, you can use the Windows Updatehistory command to view update history for a specific user or all users on a system.

To list all installed updates on a system, you can use the following command:

Windows Update history\Installed Updates

To list all updates that have been attempted but failed, you can use the following command:

Windows Update history\Non-Installed Updates

To view update history for a specific user, you can use the following command:

Windows Update history\

Installing Windows Updates from the Command Line

Windows updates are a necessary part of keeping your computer secure and running optimally. However, many people find the process of installing updates from the Windows Update menu to be time-consuming and challenging. This is where the command line comes in handy.

Using the `wuauserv` service, you can install updates from the command line using simple commands. This means that updates can be installed automatically, without having to wait for Windows Update to check for and install new updates. Additionally, this method offers great flexibility and control over how and when updates are installed. You can even schedule them to run at specific times or on specific days. This gives you tremendous control over how your computer is configured and managed.

To use the `wuauserv` service, you must first create a registry key and set a value for it. The following command will accomplish this:

New-Item -Path “HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows Update\Settings” -Name “Automatic Updates” -Type REG_DWORD -Value 1

Once the registry key has been created, you can start using the `wuauserv` service by issuing the following command:

Start-Service wuauserv

Automating Windows Updates from the Command Line

Windows updates are a critical part of keeping your computer secure and up to date. However, many people find the process of updating difficult and time-consuming. In this section, we will show you how to get updates from the command line, and how to install them automatically.

First, let’s get a list of updates from the command line. To do this, we will use the Windows Update cmdlet. To get a list of available updates, type

> Get-WUInstall -AllAvailable

This command will return a list of all available updates for your computer. Next, we’ll need to decide which updates we want to install. To do this, we can use the Install-WUUpdate cmdlet. This command will allow us to choose which updates we want to install. We can also specify whether or not to keep any existing software installed on our computer as part of the update process (we will cover this in more detail later). Type

> Install-WUUpdate –Updates “KB3033929” –NoRestart -Force

This command will install the KB3033929 update on our computer. Finally, there are some benefits that come with installing updates from the command line. For example,

1) it can be faster than downloading and installing an update through Windows Update itself, and

2) you don’t have to worry about making any mistakes during the installation process–the cmdlets run silently in the background without asking you any questions!

Tips and Tricks for Using the Command Line to Manage Windows Updates

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t always have time to manually check for and install updates on your computer. That’s where the command line comes in handy! You can use it to list all the available updates, install them, uninstall them, or hide certain updates from being installed. In addition to managing Windows Updates from the command line, there are a few other useful commands that you may find helpful. Let’s take a look!

To list all the available updates, use the following command:

wusa.exe /detectnow

To install an update, use the following command:

wusa.exe /install /quiet /norestart

To uninstall an update, use the following command:

wusa.exe /uninstall /nosplash

Common Errors When Trying to List or Install Windows Updates from the Command Line

When trying to list or install Windows updates from the command line, there are a few common errors that can occur. The first error is that the command does not recognize the asterisk (*) wildcard character. The second error is that you must enclose the update KB number in double quotation marks. The third error is that you incorrectly typed the command syntax. The fourth error is that you did not specify a target operating system. If you are using Windows PowerShell, specify the operating system by using the TargetOS parameter. If you are using WMI, use a WHERE clause to specify the operating system.

The fifth error is that you have not set up the Windows Update service. To set up the Windows Update service, type the following command at an elevated prompt: net start wuauserv The sixth error is that you are trying to install a security update that was released after your computer was updated. To install a security update, type the following command at an elevated prompt:

wusa /quiet /norestart

FAQs About Managing Windows Updates from the Command Prompt

If you’re like most people, you probably rely on Windows Update to keep your computer up-to-date and secure. But what if you want to take greater control over when and how updates are installed? You can use the command prompt to manage windows updates. This allows for a more customized approach to updating your computer, which can be beneficial in many ways. For example, it can allow you to install updates at a time that is more convenient for you. Additionally, it gives you greater control over which updates are installed. This means that you can choose which security fixes and other enhancements are included with each update.

To manage windows updates using the command prompt, you first need to open it. To do this, click Start, type cmd in the search box, and press Enter. When the Command Prompt window opens, type the following:

net stop wuauserv

net start wuauserv

The first command stops Windows Update services. The second starts them. Note: If you’re using a version of Windows older than Vista, you’ll need to use a different command to disable automatic updating (for example, net stopwuauclt). Continue reading below for more detailed instructions on how to use these commands to manage your updates.

In Conclusion

In conclusion, Microsoft has made it much easier to manage updates in recent versions of Windows. One of the easiest ways to install updates is from the command line. By following the instructions in this blog post, you can list, check, and install Windows updates from the command line.


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